The ‘Veil’ as the device of ‘growth’ in The Souls of Black Folk

In The Souls of Black Folk (1965), W. E. B. DuBois uses the concept of ‘veil’ as a device for the clandestine growth of the black intellectual, instead of using it only as a means of separation from the white world. With immense profundity and diligence, DuBois weaves the threads of the ‘veil’ around theContinue reading “The ‘Veil’ as the device of ‘growth’ in The Souls of Black Folk”

Re-visiting Racial discrimination and an encounter with female chauvinism in Dutchman

In Dutchman (1964), Leroi Jones brings into life racial oppression of the past times through the demonstration of intolerance and hatred of the coloured skin, which seems to be still prevalent in America. The play showcases the interaction between two characters, – one, a Black man, Clay and another, a white woman, Lula. Lula, whoContinue reading “Re-visiting Racial discrimination and an encounter with female chauvinism in Dutchman”

A Coloured Man’s American Dream – a Dream of Issues

In A Raisin in the Sun, Lorraine Hansberry, deracinates the real substance of the American Dream underneath the camouflaged layers of illusions about it. The Black American, Walter, happens to be inflicted with the glamour of the American dream and become rich soon. However, the dream of Walter is entangled in multiple issues gradually corrodingContinue reading “A Coloured Man’s American Dream – a Dream of Issues”

Reconnection as a Compromise in Go Tell it on the Mountain

In Go Tell it on the Mountain (1952), James Baldwin, constructs the edifice of ‘sin’ and ‘redemption’ put into one structure, – amalgamated, – and questioned at the same time. This complex construct results in a seeming redemption of the protagonist, John, which may not be redemption at all. The facts that indicate towards hisContinue reading “Reconnection as a Compromise in Go Tell it on the Mountain”

Confluences: Postcolonialism, African American Literary Studies, and the Black Atlantic

Confluences: Postcolonialism, African American Literary Studies, and the Black Atlantic authored by John Cullen Gruesser is a comprehensive and innovative compilation that reveals the  prevalent links between the Postcolonial, the African American and the Black Atlantic studies. Dr. John Cullen Gruesser is a Professor of English at Kean University in New Jersey. He is widelyContinue reading “Confluences: Postcolonialism, African American Literary Studies, and the Black Atlantic”

The Window as a way to freedom in The Street

In The Street (1946), Ann Petry eulogizes a black woman’s veneration for her dreams and for her life that she visualizes ahead of time. The Street symbolizes that indomitable and unconquerable spirit of a woman that never seems to take respite from the journey started. The imagery of ‘the window’ is however, another strong signifierContinue reading “The Window as a way to freedom in The Street”

Optimism, hope and Resilience in In the Castle of My Skin By – George Lamming

In In the Castle of My Skin, George Lamming presents people’s optimism, hope and resilience as mechanisms to deal with the remainders of colonialism and continue the struggle against the persisting exploitation in the Barbados society. These people of the Barbados society are seen as the strongest representation of patience and persistence. Possessing tremendous venerationContinue reading “Optimism, hope and Resilience in In the Castle of My Skin By – George Lamming”

‘Colonial displacement’ and ‘Alienation’ in Rabindranath Tagore’s The Postmaster

In Rabindranath Tagore’s The Postmaster, a severe colonial displacement can be noticed working all the way from actually physically displacing people for survival to creating emotional derangement of the basic human nature of valuing another human in terms of emotions, sympathy and compassion. The people working for the white man’s system, as a result ofContinue reading “‘Colonial displacement’ and ‘Alienation’ in Rabindranath Tagore’s The Postmaster”

Womanhood as colonized, Manhood as Colonizer in Buchi Emecheta’s The Joys of Motherhood

In The Joys of Motherhood, Buchi Emecheta indirectly suggests an identification of the concept of Womanhood-Manhood with the concept of Colonized-Colonizer (in the postcolonial phase) respectively. With careful observation and remarkable diligence she beautifully interweaves and presents a strong connection, establishing astounding relationship between the two powerful concepts occurring simultaneously in the Ibo society. She,Continue reading “Womanhood as colonized, Manhood as Colonizer in Buchi Emecheta’s The Joys of Motherhood”

An Encounter with Disaster – “An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire” By- Arundhati Roy

In An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire, Arundhati Roy critically examines the ambiguous and inconsistent concepts of Neoliberal capitalism, globalization especially concerned with the corporate aspect of it, a disguised terrorism in the name of Empire. In the chapter, “Do Turkeys Enjoy Thanksgiving?”, Roy sarcastically brings forth the discussion about New Imperialism unraveling the manyContinue reading “An Encounter with Disaster – “An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire” By- Arundhati Roy”